• Integer malesuada commodo nulla

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things according to the most exact and perfect rules of art.

    Let opinion be taken away, and no man will think himself wronged. If no man shall think himself wronged, then is there no more any such thing as wrong. That which makes not man himself the worse, cannot make his life the worse, neither can it hurt him either inwardly or outwardly. It was expedient in nature that it should be so, and therefore necessary. Is any man so foolish as to fear change, to which all things that once were not owe their being? And what is it, that is more pleasing and more familiar to the nature of the universe? How couldst thou thyself use thy ordinary hot baths, should not the wood that heateth them first be changed? How couldst thou receive any nourishment from those things that thou hast eaten, if they should not be changed? Can anything else almost (that is useful and profitable) be brought to pass without change? How then dost not thou perceive, that for thee also, by death, to come to change, is a thing of the very same nature, and as necessary for the nature of the universe?

    Read More
  • Aliquam tincidunt mauris eu risus

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Read More
  • Vivamus vestibulum nulla nec ante

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things according to the most exact and perfect rules of art.

    Let opinion be taken away, and no man will think himself wronged. If no man shall think himself wronged, then is there no more any such thing as wrong. That which makes not man himself the worse, cannot make his life the worse, neither can it hurt him either inwardly or outwardly. It was expedient in nature that it should be so, and therefore necessary. Is any man so foolish as to fear change, to which all things that once were not owe their being? And what is it, that is more pleasing and more familiar to the nature of the universe? How couldst thou thyself use thy ordinary hot baths, should not the wood that heateth them first be changed? How couldst thou receive any nourishment from those things that thou hast eaten, if they should not be changed? Can anything else almost (that is useful and profitable) be brought to pass without change? How then dost not thou perceive, that for thee also, by death, to come to change, is a thing of the very same nature, and as necessary for the nature of the universe?

    Begin each day by telling yourself: Today I shall be meeting with interference, ingratitude, insolence, disloyalty, ill-will, and selfishness – all of them due to the offenders’ ignorance of what is good or evil.

    When you arise in the morning think of what a which today arm you against the present. I have often wondered how it is that every man loves himself more than all the rest of men, but yet sets less value on his own opinions of himself than on the opinions of others. Begin each day by telling yourself: Today I shall be meeting with interference, ingratitude, insolence, disloyalty, ill-will, and selfishness – all of them due to the offenders’ ignorance of what is good or evil. Perfection of character is this: to live each day as if it were your last, without frenzy, without apathy, without pretence. The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts: therefore, guard accordingly, and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue and reasonable nature.

    Behold and observe, what is the state of their rational part; and those that the world doth account wise, see what things they fly and are afraid of; and what things they hunt after.

    What those things are in themselves, which by the greatest part are esteemed good, thou mayest gather even from this. For if a man shall hear things mentioned as good, which are really good indeed, such as are prudence, temperance, justice, fortitude, after so much heard and conceived, he cannot endure to hear of any more, for the word good is properly spoken of them. But as for those which by the vulgar are esteemed good, if he shall hear them mentioned as good, he doth hearken for more. He is well contented to hear, that what is spoken by the comedian, is but familiarly and popularly spoken, so that even the vulgar apprehend the difference. For why is it else, that this offends not and needs not to be excused, when virtues are styled good: but that which is spoken in commendation of wealth, pleasure, or honour, we entertain it only as merrily and pleasantly spoken? Proceed therefore, and inquire further, whether it may not be that those things also which being mentioned upon the stage were merrily, and with great applause of the multitude, scoffed at with this jest, that they that possessed them had not in all the world of their own. Whether, I say, those ought not also in very deed to be much respected, and esteemed of, as the only things that are truly good.

  • Praesent placerat risus quis eros

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things according to the most exact and perfect rules of art.

    Let opinion be taken away, and no man will think himself wronged. If no man shall think himself wronged, then is there no more any such thing as wrong. That which makes not man himself the worse, cannot make his life the worse, neither can it hurt him either inwardly or outwardly. It was expedient in nature that it should be so, and therefore necessary. Is any man so foolish as to fear change, to which all things that once were not owe their being? And what is it, that is more pleasing and more familiar to the nature of the universe? How couldst thou thyself use thy ordinary hot baths, should not the wood that heateth them first be changed? How couldst thou receive any nourishment from those things that thou hast eaten, if they should not be changed? Can anything else almost (that is useful and profitable) be brought to pass without change? How then dost not thou perceive, that for thee also, by death, to come to change, is a thing of the very same nature, and as necessary for the nature of the universe?

    Begin each day by telling yourself: Today I shall be meeting with interference, ingratitude, insolence, disloyalty, ill-will, and selfishness – all of them due to the offenders’ ignorance of what is good or evil.

    When you arise in the morning think of what a which today arm you against the present. I have often wondered how it is that every man loves himself more than all the rest of men, but yet sets less value on his own opinions of himself than on the opinions of others. Begin each day by telling yourself: Today I shall be meeting with interference, ingratitude, insolence, disloyalty, ill-will, and selfishness – all of them due to the offenders’ ignorance of what is good or evil. Perfection of character is this: to live each day as if it were your last, without frenzy, without apathy, without pretence. The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts: therefore, guard accordingly, and take care that you entertain no notions unsuitable to virtue and reasonable nature.

    Behold and observe, what is the state of their rational part; and those that the world doth account wise, see what things they fly and are afraid of; and what things they hunt after.

    What those things are in themselves, which by the greatest part are esteemed good, thou mayest gather even from this. For if a man shall hear things mentioned as good, which are really good indeed, such as are prudence, temperance, justice, fortitude, after so much heard and conceived, he cannot endure to hear of any more, for the word good is properly spoken of them. But as for those which by the vulgar are esteemed good, if he shall hear them mentioned as good, he doth hearken for more. He is well contented to hear, that what is spoken by the comedian, is but familiarly and popularly spoken, so that even the vulgar apprehend the difference. For why is it else, that this offends not and needs not to be excused, when virtues are styled good: but that which is spoken in commendation of wealth, pleasure, or honour, we entertain it only as merrily and pleasantly spoken? Proceed therefore, and inquire further, whether it may not be that those things also which being mentioned upon the stage were merrily, and with great applause of the multitude, scoffed at with this jest, that they that possessed them had not in all the world of their own. Whether, I say, those ought not also in very deed to be much respected, and esteemed of, as the only things that are truly good.

  • Vestibulum commodo felis quis tortor

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things according to the most exact and perfect rules of art.

    Let opinion be taken away, and no man will think himself wronged. If no man shall think himself wronged, then is there no more any such thing as wrong. That which makes not man himself the worse, cannot make his life the worse, neither can it hurt him either inwardly or outwardly. It was expedient in nature that it should be so, and therefore necessary. Is any man so foolish as to fear change, to which all things that once were not owe their being? And what is it, that is more pleasing and more familiar to the nature of the universe? How couldst thou thyself use thy ordinary hot baths, should not the wood that heateth them first be changed? How couldst thou receive any nourishment from those things that thou hast eaten, if they should not be changed? Can anything else almost (that is useful and profitable) be brought to pass without change? How then dost not thou perceive, that for thee also, by death, to come to change, is a thing of the very same nature, and as necessary for the nature of the universe?

    Read More
  • Praesent placerat risus quis eros

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Read More
  • Vestibulum auctor dapibus neque

    From the fame and memory of him that begot me I have learned both shamefastness and manlike behaviour. Of my mother I have learned to be religious, and bountiful; and to forbear, not only to do, but to intend any evil; to content myself with a spare diet, and to fly all such excess as is incidental to great wealth. Of my great-grandfather, both to frequent public schools and auditories, and to get me good and able teachers at home; and that I ought not to think much, if upon such occasions, I were at excessive charges.

    Let nothing be done rashly, and at random, but all things according to the most exact and perfect rules of art.

    Let opinion be taken away, and no man will think himself wronged. If no man shall think himself wronged, then is there no more any such thing as wrong.

    Read More
  • Text Styles

    You have power over your mind – not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength. The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts. Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth. Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one. Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together,but do so with all your heart. If you are distressed by anything external, the pain is not due to the thing itself, but to your estimate of it; and this you have the power to revoke at any moment. When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive, to think, to enjoy, to love …

    Read More
  • Galleries

    Pellentesque aliquet nibh nec urna. In nisi neque, aliquet vel, dapibus id, mattis vel, nisi. Sed pretium, ligula sollicitudin laoreet viverra, tortor libero sodales leo, eget blandit nunc tortor eu nibh. Nullam mollis. Ut justo. Suspendisse potenti. Morbi purus libero, faucibus adipiscing, commodo quis, gravida id, est. Sed lectus. Praesent elementum hendrerit tortor. Sed semper lorem at felis. Morbi interdum mollis sapien. Sed ac risus. Phasellus lacinia, magna a ullamcorper laoreet, lectus arcu pulvinar risus, vitae facilisis libero dolor a purus.

    Morbi purus libero, faucibus adipiscing, commodo quis, gravida id, est. Sed lectus. Praesent elementum hendrerit tortor. Sed semper lorem at felis. Morbi interdum mollis sapien. Sed ac risus. Phasellus lacinia, magna a ullamcorper laoreet, lectus arcu pulvinar risus, vitae facilisis libero dolor a purus.

    Pellentesque aliquet nibh nec urna. In nisi neque, aliquet vel, dapibus id, mattis vel, nisi. Sed pretium, ligula sollicitudin laoreet viverra, tortor libero sodales leo, eget blandit nunc tortor eu nibh. Nullam mollis. Ut justo. Suspendisse potenti.

    Pellentesque aliquet nibh nec urna. In nisi neque, aliquet vel, dapibus id, mattis vel, nisi. Sed pretium, ligula sollicitudin laoreet viverra, tortor libero sodales leo, eget blandit nunc tortor eu nibh. Nullam mollis. Ut justo. Suspendisse potenti.

    Morbi purus libero, faucibus adipiscing, commodo quis, gravida id, est. Sed lectus. Praesent elementum hendrerit tortor. Sed semper lorem at felis. Morbi interdum mollis sapien. Sed ac risus. Phasellus lacinia, magna a ullamcorper laoreet, lectus arcu pulvinar risus, vitae facilisis libero dolor a purus.

  • Springer, Springer, ile można zachwycać się Springerem?

    Nowy Springer to od jakiegoś czasu już zawsze jest wydarzenie. Przekornie chciałam temu zaprzeczyć i widząc zajawki na instagramie czy czytając wyrywki recenzji oznajmiających, że „Dwunaste: nie myśl, że uciekniesz” jest nieco inaczej formalnie skonstruowane pod względem narracji niż poprzednie jego książki – potajemnie liczyłam, że uda mi się tę książkę znielubić i powiedzieć – a nie wyszło! Serio? Springer, Springer, ileż można się zachwycać Springerem.

    No ale okazało się, że można, nawet trzeba, choć tę książkę czyta się trudniej niż chociażby „Źle urodzone” (przeczytałam w dwa dni) czy „Miasto Archipelag.Polska mniejszych miast”. Powody tego są co najmniej w moim odczuciu dwa:

    dlaczego jest trudno

    pierwszy to forma, całość jest niejako zbiorem niby luźno powiązanych obserwacji związanych z miejscami, architekturą, mostami. Dużo jest historii z przeszłości dotyczących ludzi związanych z poszczególnymi miejscami, dużo zmian perspektywy mówiącego oraz formy przekazu, od relacji, snucia zasłyszanych opowieści, po formę listu czy zmianę osoby narratora. Żeby się w tym nie pogubić, trzeba się skupić, żeby chwycić mocno wątek i mieć stale w głowie przewodnią myśl. Mnie nie było łatwo. Może też dlatego, że przez uzależnienia od telefonu i internetu coraz trudniej jest mi się skoncentrować i przyznaję się do tego jak alkoholik na zebraniu AA, więc kiedy ktoś wymaga ode mnie skupienia, to przychodzi mi to z pewną trudnością. Ale szłam w to dalej, bo kiedy domykała się tam jedna historia, wiedziałam, że za chwilę będzie kolejna, zapewne nieoczekiwanie zaskakująca. I w rzeczy samej tak było.

    W ogóle całość przywiodła mi skojarzenie z Kodem da Vinci Dana Browna i z panem Samochodzikiem Nienackiego, serio. Podobieństwa polegają na tym, że mamy tu tajemnicę i osobę, która stara się dociec, na czym polega złożoność tej tajemnicy, więc wplątuje się w różne historie, węszy, nagabuje ludzi, wyciąga od nich szczegóły i stara się złożyć w całość odpowiedź na pytanie – czym jest prawo Jante w Danii, o co w tym chodzi i dlaczego osnuwa ten kraj mrokiem, który dla ludzi otumanionych marketingowym hygge i statystykami na temat tego, że Dania to najszczęśliwszy kraj na świecie, jest niedostrzegalny. A on go dostrzegł i wymyślił sobie, że zgłębi jego istotę.

    I to jest drugi powód, dlaczego trudno czytało się tę książkę. Bo prawo Jante, na fasadach którego oparte jest życie duńskiego społeczeństwa, jest dość mroczne i opresywne i to w sposób, którego naprawdę człowiek by się po miłych Duńczykach nie spodziewał.

    gdzie jest moc

    Ale jako się rzekło, nie są to trudności z kategorii zniechęcenie. To jest raczej jakaś wartość dodana. Narracja Springera ma ogólnie taką moc, że czyta się o miejscach tak zwanych nieoczywistych, którymi nie są błękitne Malediwy, przereklamowane uliczki Barcelony czy egzotyczne resorty na Sri Lance, jak o destynacjach nad wyraz właśnie atrakcyjnych. Moim zdaniem to Springer zapoczątkował swoimi reportażami modę czy trend na odkrywanie zapomnianych, dziwnych i niepozornych miejsc, przywracał należne miejsca w pamięci socrealistycznym budynkom w Polsce, zapomnianym miejscom  gdzieś na końcu świata, zaczęliśmy trochę „myśleć i widzieć Springerem”, odnajdywać w pozornie błahej codzienności – coś niezwykłego. Myślę, że jemu zawdzięcza się zwrot uwagi ku pozornie niepozornym obiektom, do starania się, aby zobaczyć to, co umyka  nam w codziennej roszczeniowości wobec rzeczywistości, która musi być koniecznie jakaś instagramowa, podkręcona i spektakularna, aby przykuła naszą uwagę. A Springer handluje rzeczami totalnie nie stuningowanymi, wygrzebuje ze szczelin rzeczywistości wątki, które umykają naszej przekarmionej uwadze.

    Tym razem prawu Jante i miejscom, gdzie to się wykluło poświęcił 4 lata pracy i poszukiwań i kiedy się czyta o tym wysiłku warsztatowym, to robi się w głowie solidne „wow”. Że zasiada się do pisania bazując na tak pieczołowicie zebranym materiale, po pokonaniu mnóstwa niedogodności i trudności z tym związanych, bo okazało się, że Duńczycy wcale o tym Jante nie chcieli gadać, zbywali go i udawali, że nie wiedzą o co chodzi. Jak się okazało te obawy były słuszne, bo to całe prawo Jante skrywa pod sobą naprawdę sporo przykrych mroczności.
    Chociaż w sumie ciężko stwierdzić, czy natura ludzka sama z siebie skłonna jest do nikczemności czy też zasady plemiennego współżycia potrafią tę nikczemność jeszcze mocniej podkręcić lub zniwelować. Trudno mi stwierdzić jak to jest. Wydaje mi się, że wszystkie prawa, jakie ludzie ludziom spisują, żeby określić normy współżycia społecznego są w jakiś sposób opresywne, począwszy od dekalogu skończywszy na tych 13 zasadach prawa Jante.

    Jante versus hygge

    W każdym razie Springer podjął wysiłek, żeby pokazać, aby nie wierzyć fasadom. Szczęśliwość Danii i jej obywateli to nie są wcale cozy wełniane skarpetki, ciepły sweter i siedzenie w oknie z kubkiem kawy i patrzenie w dal ze świadomością, że państwo ogarnia mi życie i nie muszę się martwić za bardzo jak przeżyć do 1-go, bo wszystko jakoś tam mi się należy z nadania bycia duńskim obywatelem.

    No a tu się okazuje, że ci Duńczycy wcale nie są ani tacy szczególnie szczęśliwi, ani sympatyczni. Za fasadą miłych, nordyckich twarzy kryją się wsobność, ksenofobia, nacjonalizm, niechęć do innych, niechęć do zmian, jakiś rodzaj fatalizmu. To wszystko umieszczone jest w głównej zasadzie, że czucie się lepszym od innych duńskich pobratymców, chęć wyróżnienia się to obciach, to coś niedopuszczalnego. Dla lepszego zobrazowania – to coś takiego, że kiedy w Polsce ktoś kupował auto, wszyscy mu zazdrościli, zaś w Danii uważali to za zbędną błazenadę i odnosili się do takich chętnych na posiadanie spektakularnych rzeczy czy osiągnięć, za szczyt złego gustu. Uważali i uważają, że podstawą szczęśliwości jest zasada, że nieszczęście i szczęście powinno przypadać każdemu członkowie narodu po równo, to czyni wszystkich szczęśliwymi, że nikt się zanadto nie pogrąży w tej społeczności ani też nikt nie będzie zanadto szczęśliwy. Według tego, co udało się Springerowi zbadać w ciągu tych 4 lat, Duńczycy wcale się do tego nie chcą przyznawać. Wygodne dla nich jest, że większość ludzi myśli, że prawo Jante to taki tam nieszkodliwy folklor.

    Tymczasem Springer uporczywie przesiaduje na odległych, wyludnionych wyspach na północy Danii, wciśniętych w mało przyjazne fiordy i drąży, o co chodzi. Robi to tak, że chce się doświadczyć szarej, ołowianej mgły nad fiordem na wyspie Mors czy kupować piwo w wyludnionym supermarkecie na wyspie Fo.I to jest właśnie wielkość takiego pisania, że nie cudownie hipsterska przyjazna Kopenhaga, nawet nie Aarhus czy Aalborg, tylko duńskie zadupia i co tam oni, ci Duńczycy, kryją za tymi swoimi oknami, kiedy spokojnie piją sobie kawkę w sobotę siedząc w pidżamie i patrząc przed siebie z mocnym przekonaniem, że takie jest życie i tak trzeba. Pić co sobota tę kawę na prowincji i cieszyć się, że zmrok zawsze zapada tam za wcześnie i na długo.

    Mnie uderzyło jeszcze jedno odkrycie podczas lektury, takie prywatne.

    Jante a …buddyzm

    Czytając wykładnię prawa Jante na tabliczce pożegnalnej dla robotników fabryki produkującej artykuły żelazne skojarzyłam te życzenia z zaleceniami …lamy Ole Nydhala, który krzewi, uwaga!, tybetański buddyzm na terenach krajów Europy Środkowej i Zachodniej starając się buddyjskie idee przetransponować na umysły i sposoby pojmowania ludzi zachodu. Tak się składa, że Ole Nydhal jest Duńczykiem, co bardzo często w wywiadach i swoich książkach podkreśla i z czego jest ewidentnie dumny. I to, co on propaguje, czego naucza, moim zdaniem jest ściśle powiązane a prawem Jante właśnie. Otóż wg niego w buddyzmie najważniejsze jest, aby pozbyć się przeszkadzających emocji, prócz gniewu są nimi pycha, wywyższanie się, duma, roszczeniowość a jedynym sensem naszego życia, które mija i minie jest działanie dla dobra innych, bo tylko tak można stać się umysłem oświeconym, kiedy uczyni się pożytek ze swojego ciała i umysłu. Jedyną hierarchią jest to, ile dobrego zrobiło się dla innych. I to samo wypisane na tabliczkach dostali ci duńscy robotnicy, kiedy zamknięto im fabrykę i podziękowano za pracę. „Musisz wiedzieć, że twoje życie i istnienie naszego społeczeństwa w wielkim stopniu zależą od twoich starań. My, ty i ja, możemy wspólnie rozwiązywać problemy. Musisz wiedzieć, że jest w tobie coś dobrego i wartościowego, coś czego potrzebujemy, Musisz wiedzieć, że masz cechy, które lubimy”. I tak dalej. Tak więc oto duńska zasada kolektywizmu  i nie wywyższania się ponad innych przenika do propagowanego w Europie buddyzmu, bo choć umysły nasze są nieskończone i pełne siły, to tylko po to, żeby czynić dobro na rzecz innych. Wtedy nasz duch będzie przenikał uniwersum nawet kiedy fizycznie nie będziemy istnieć.

    Nie oceniam czy to dobrze dla buddyzmu w Europie czy też nie. Po prostu  wychwyciłam pewne korelacje i to przywiodło mi na myśl, że ludzkie potrzeby, aby jakoś uporządkować swoją egzystencję to wielki tygiel, w którym gotują się przeróżne wpływy. Chociaż buddyzm z pewnością ma na celu uczynienie nas bardziej zadowolonymi z życia, natomiast prawo Jante ma bardziej na celu zadbanie, aby nikt się nie wychylał, robił swoje i siedział cicho. Tylko jak wyśledził Springer takie wyparcie się pragnień pociąga za sobą dość niemiłe skutki, dużo rzeczy niefajnych tam dzieje za oknami duńskich schludnych domków.

    Oczywiście nie rzecz w tym, żeby odpowiadać sobie na pytanie, kto winien, czy jak żyć. Rzecz chyba bardziej w tym, że nic nie jest takie jak się zrazu wydaje i to głównie o tym jest dla mnie ta książka, o poszukiwaniu świadomości, dlaczego pewne rzeczy układają się tak a nie inaczej, czy można to zmienić i przed tym uciec, czy jesteśmy zdolni do tego, żeby przestawiać wajchy naszych narodowych losów. Otóż okazuje się, że nie bardzo, ale mimo to ja bym się nie zniechęcała, nie dlatego, że widzę nadzieję na zmianę swojego z góry jakoś tam zaplanowanego losu, ale mogę sobie pojechać na wsypę Mors i popatrzeć na ołowianą mgłę nad fiordem, albo za własnym nawet oknem i pomyśleć: aha, więc w ten sposób.

  • zjedz kanapkę